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Fillip #11 out now

Fillip is a publication of art, culture and ideas released three times a year by the Projectile Publishing Society from Vancouver, British Columbia.

Featuring: Lawrence Rinder, Haris Epaminonda & Jacob Fabricius, Arni Haraldsson, Keith Bormuth, Alex Kitnick, Jamie Hilder, David Berridge, Michalis Pichler, Milena Tomic, Renato Rodrigues da Silva, Gabrielle Moser, Antonia Hirsch, Aaron Peck, Kim Dhillon, Kate Armstrong, Liz Park.

P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center

On Friday October 2nd 2009 at 2pm Un Coup de Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard (Sculpture) will be launched at PS1 in the context of the New York Art Book Fair with music.

The music is created by playing the book on an automatic piano.

New York Art Book Fair


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Fillip #11 out now

Fillip #11 features Statements on Appropriation (first printed version).

"Michalis Pichler's Statements on Appropriation, published in English and German, is both a study in artistic appropriation and an art work in text form. " - Jeff Khonsary, Publisher & Kristina Lee Podesva, Editor


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Der Einzige und sein Eigentum

Michalis  Pichler, 2009

appropriation/ new vision of the manifest of individual anarchism as published 1844 by Max Stirner under the very same title (The Ego and Its Own). The chapter titles and headers have been maintained, while the main text has been edited down to include first-person-signifiers only, and a lot of white floating around it. layout, typeset and dimensions follow the German version, which has been in print almost unchanged for the last 37 years by Reclam Universal-Bibliothek.

Appropriation/ neue Vision des Manifestes, welches 1844 von Max Stirner unter demselben Titel publiziert wurde.

Die Kapitel und Seitenueberschriften wurden uebernommen, waehrend der Haupttext nur die deklinierten Ich-Konstellationen des Originaltextes enthaelt. Layout, Typografie und Dimensionen folgen den deutschen Reclam-Ausgaben des Stirner-Textes seit 1972.

TWENTYSIX GASOLINE STATIONS

The "same" station photographed all over different locations in Brandenburg, Thuringen, Sachsen-Anhalt and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

"The eccentric stations were the first ones I threw out" is written on a photographed piece of paper, at the end of the book. 
Ed Ruscha had published a book under the same title and outer appearance in 1963.

The book comes with translucent wrappers.

36 pages, 18 x 14 cm, 2009
Printed Matter, Inc., New York, ISBN 978-0-89439-044-4
and "greatest hits" Berlin, ISBN 978-3-86874-004-2

Un coup de dés: poème, image of sculpture

Met: Fernande de Korte, Anna Hakkens, Michalis Pichler, Petrus Hoosemans, Ernst van den Hemel (moderator)

(text: Marije Koens)

In een eeuw tijd is Un coup de dés jamais n'abolira le hasard mínstens drie keer verschenen. Echter wel in verschillende vormen en bij andere kunstenaars. Als eerst werd het in 1914 in dichtvorm gepubliceerd (met de ondertitel poéme) naar de uitgebreide aantekeningen en instructies van de destijds reeds overleden Stéphane Mallarmé.

STEFAN SCHUELKE zeigt KÜNSTLERBÜCHER

Eröffnung
DO 26.11.2009
18–21.00
UHR

BQ
Büro BQ, Rosa-Luxemburg-Straße 26, 10178 Berlin
Tel. +49-30-23457316, Fax +49-30-23457325
infoatbqberlin.de, www.bqberlin.de
Di–Fr 11–18 Uhr

Abbildung links: Buecher von Stéphane Mallarmé, Marcel Broodthaers, Michael Maranda, Cerith Wyn Evans, Michalis Pichler

1.    Conceptual cooks are mystics rather than rationalists. They leap to conclusions that logic cannot reach.
2.    Rational judgements repeat rational judgements.
3.    Irrational judgements lead to new experience.
4.    Formal cooking is essentially rational.
5.    Irrational thoughts should be followed absolutely and logically.
6.    If the cook changes his/her mind midway through the execution of the dish he/she compromises the result and repeats past results.
7.    The cook's will is secondary to the process he/she initiates from idea to completion. His/Her wilfulness may only be ego.
8.    When words such as Hors d'œuvre and Entrée are used, they connote a whole tradition and imply a consequent acceptance of this tradition, thus placing limitations on the cook who would be reluctant to make cooking that goes beyond the limitations.
9.    The concept and idea are different. The former implies a general direction while the latter is the component. Ideas implement the concept.
10.    Ideas can be works of cooking; they are in a chain of development that may eventually find some form. All ideas need not be made physical.
11.    Ideas do not necessarily proceed in logical order. They may set one off in unexpected directions, but an idea must necessarily be completed in the mind before the next one is formed.
12.    For each work of cooking that becomes physical there are many variations that do not.
13.    A work of cooking may be understood as a conductor from the cook's mind to the eater's. But it may never reach the eater, or it may never leave the cook's mind.
14.    The words of one cook to another may induce an idea chain, if they share the same concept.
15.    Since no form is intrinsically superior to another, the cook may use any form, from an expression of words (written or spoken) to physical reality, equally.
16.    If flavors are used, and they proceed from ideas about cuisine, then they are cuisine and (not) perfumery; numbers are (not) mathematics.
17.    All ideas are cooking if they are concerned with cooking and fall within the conventions of cooking.
18.    One usually understands the cooking of the past by applying the convention of the present, thus misunderstanding the cooking of the past.
19.    The conventions of cooking are altered by works of cooking.
20.    Successful cooking changes our understanding of the conventions by altering our perceptions.
21.    Perception of ideas leads to new ideas.
22.    The cook cannot imagine his/her cooking, and cannot perceive it until it is complete.
23.    The cook may misperceive (understand it differently from the cook) a work of cooking but still be set off in his/her own chain of thought by that misconstrual.
24.    Perception is subjective.
25.    The cook may not necessarily understand his/her own cooking. His/Her perception is neither better nor worse than that of others.
26.    A cook may perceive the cooking of others better than his/her own.
27.    The concept of a work of cooking may involve the matter of the dish or the process in which it is made.
28.    Once the idea of the dish is established in the cook's mind and the final form is decided, the process is carried out blindly. There are many side effects that the cook cannot imagine. These may be used as ideas for new works.
29.    The process is mechanical and should not be tampered with. It should run its course.
30.    There are many elements involved in a work of cooking. The most important are the most obvious.
31.    If a cook uses the same form in a group of works, and changes the material, one would assume the cook's concept involved the material.
32.    Banal ideas cannot be rescued by beautiful execution.
33.    It is difficult to bungle a good idea.
34.    When a cook learns his/her craft too well he/she makes slick cooking.
35.    These sentences comment on cooking, but are (not) cooking.

Michalis Pichler

1.    Conceptual writers are mystics rather than rationalists. They leap to conclusions that logic cannot reach.
2.    Rational judgements repeat rational judgements.
3.    Irrational judgements lead to new experience.
4.    Formal writing is essentially rational.
5.    Irrational thoughts should be followed absolutely and logically.
6.    If the writer changes his/her mind midway through the execution of the piece he/she compromises the result and repeats past results.
7.    The writer's will is secondary to the process he/she initiates from idea to completion. His/Her wilfulness may only be ego.
8.    When words such as drama and prose are used, they connote a whole tradition and imply a consequent acceptance of this tradition, thus placing limitations on the writer who would be reluctant to make writing that goes beyond the limitations.
9.    The concept and idea are different. The former implies a general direction while the latter is the component. Ideas implement the concept.
10.    Ideas can be works of writing; they are in a chain of development that may eventually find some form. All ideas need not be made physical.
11.    Ideas do not necessarily proceed in logical order. They may set one off in unexpected directions, but an idea must necessarily be completed in the mind before the next one is formed.
12.    For each work of writing that becomes physical there are many variations that do not.
13.    A work of writing may be understood as a conductor from the writer's mind to the reader's. But it may never reach the reader, or it may never leave the writer's mind.
14.    The words of one writer to another may induce an idea chain, if they share the same concept.
15.    Since no form is intrinsically superior to another, the writer may use any form, from an expression of words (written or spoken) to physical reality, equally.
16.    If images are used, and they proceed from ideas about literature, then they are literature and (not) art; numbers are (not) mathematics.
17.    All ideas are writing if they are concerned with writing and fall within the conventions of writing.
18.    One usually understands the writing of the past by applying the convention of the present, thus misunderstanding the writing of the past.
19.    The conventions of writing are altered by works of writing.
20.    Successful writing changes our understanding of the conventions by altering our perceptions.
21.    Perception of ideas leads to new ideas.
22.    The writer cannot imagine his/her writing, and cannot perceive it until it is complete.
23.    The writer may misperceive (understand it differently from the writer) a work of writing but still be set off in his/her own chain of thought by that misconstrual.
24.    Perception is subjective.
25.    The writer may not necessarily understand his/her own writing. His/Her perception is neither better nor worse than that of others.
26.    A writer may perceive the writing of others better than his/her own.
27.    The concept of a work of writing may involve the matter of the piece or the process in which it is made.
28.    Once the idea of the piece is established in the writer's mind and the final form is decided, the process is carried out blindly. There are many side effects that the writer cannot imagine. These may be used as ideas for new works.
29.    The process is mechanical and should not be tampered with. It should run its course.
30.    There are many elements involved in a work of writing. The most important are the most obvious.
31.    If a writer uses the same form in a group of works, and changes the material, one would assume the writer's concept involved the material.
32.    Banal ideas cannot be rescued by beautiful execution.
33.    It is difficult to bungle a good idea.
34.    When a writer learns his/her craft too well he/she makes slick writing.
35.    These sentences comment on writing, but are (not) writing.

Michalis Pichler

AMP WORKS & Dynasty Zine cordially invite you to FITS FOR PRINTS, a pop-up store at AMP in Athens, Greece, which will feature printed matter, multiples, books, magazines and zines produced by artists as well as internationally renowned publishers.

Most of this stuff is distributed in Greece by OMMU distribution, who run a permanent bookshop in Athens.